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TFMoran Participates in NH CIBOR Cares 3rd Annual Charity Golf Classic

On Monday, June 10th members from TFMoran Dylan Cruess and Chris Rice played in the 3rd Annual NH CIBOR Charity Golf Tournament. The tournament was located at the Breakfast Hill Golf Club, in Greenland, NH.

NH CIBOR Cares mission is to help assist various organizations and individuals in need by providing scholarship opportunities and other important resources. Dylan Cruess and Chris Rice of TFMoran participated with Amanda Savage and Joeseph Campbell of North Branch Construction. Sadly, we were unable to bring home the trophy this year, but as always everyone had a great time on the course and was happy to support such a great cause.

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Nick Golon Featured in New England Real Estate Journal

New England Real Estate Journal’s June 7 issue features an article on solar energy by TFM Civil Department Manager and Principal, Nick Golon. Nick takes a deep dive into utility-scale solar facilities in New England and the challenges they may face in the early stages of development. See the whole article here, or continue reading below.


Harnessing the Power of the Sun with Utility-Scale PV

By Nick Golon

“Solar energy is the only permanent, inexhaustible fuel source for our civilization” – Nikola Tesla

With the words of Nikola Testa fresh in our mind, let us look to the remarkable growth undergone by solar photovoltaic (PV) generation in the last year with 23 Gigawatts (GW) of new solar generating capacity added in 2023, with even more substantial growth anticipated in 2024 with another 37 GW expected to come online based on the latest Short-Term Energy Outlook (STEO) from the U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA). These figures represent a 33% and 39% year-over-year increase. To put this in context for the baseball enthusiast this is the equivalent of going from light-hitting Mario Mendoza (known for his .200 batting average), to All-Star Rafael Palmeiro, to Hall of Famer Ty Cobb in the span of three years! These solar generation increases have been driven by many factors including lowered costs, aided by state and federal tax credits and downward pressure on prices due to wider availability of modules, but also the industry’s ability to build bigger, with the term “Utility-Scale” solar power becoming more prevalent. But what is utility-scale solar power, how can it benefit our communities, and what is driving this meteoric growth? Let’s discuss!

Although the exact definition of a “utility-scale” solar facility may vary depending on who you ask, the nature of the answer is typically the same in that it is a large-scale solar generator, 1 megawatt (MW) or greater, that connects directly into the power grid, supplying a utility with energy. Typically, there is a power purchase agreement (PPA) between a developer and the local utility, guaranteeing a market for the developer for a fixed term of time, but we are also now seeing utility-owned utility-scale solar projects, driven in part by utility providers ongoing efforts to support renewable energy initiatives. Although more top of mind, utility-scale solar is not necessarily a new technology, and has been generating reliable, clean electricity for decades. As quoted from the Solar Energy Industries Association (SEIA) “Developing utility-scale solar power is thought to be one of the fastest ways to reduce carbon emissions and put the United States on a path to a clean energy future”.

With the intent that utility-scale solar could put us on a path to carbon neutrality, what are the greatest challenges facing utility-scale solar facilities in New Hampshire? Well gentle reader, based on this author’s knowledge, it is location, location, location. In that the scale of these facilities requires approximately six to eight acres of usable land to accommodate 1 MW of generation (including solar equipment, panels, access, and stormwater management), finding a site of this size, and in appropriate proximity to existing utility infrastructure, is a challenge. On par with finding a site that meets these basic criteria are the challenges derived by local land use restrictions, as many municipalities did not contemplate the use of such facilities in the original provisions of their zoning and site plan regulations. Perceived environmental and wildlife impacts associated with land clearing and site preparation operations is also a challenge in the siting of these facilities, although these impacts may be offset with appropriate considerations for stormwater best management practices (BMP’s), the inclusion of appropriate buffers to sensitive receptors, and use of wildlife friendly fencing to accommodate wildlife connectivity.

Although the advancements in battery storage will be a prolific contributor to the advancement of solar science, we can also look in a different direction for innovation, as sometimes the best ideas are found in the most unlikely combination of two competing uses. In this case, agrivoltaics or dual-use solar and agriculture, is the use of land for both agriculture and solar energy generation. As one of the acknowledged drawbacks for solar is the conflict it presents with agricultural production, given they share the commonality of preferred land conditions that are flat and provide abundant sun, the co-location of such uses would provide benefits to both industries. Such facilities do exist in the New England area, with the 4.2-MW Rockport Maces Pond Agrivoltaic project, a dual-use community solar project located on a blueberry farm in Rockport, ME., as well as the ongoing efforts of the University of Massachusetts Amherst through their research team collaborating with approval solar developers and host farmers to implement agrivoltaic operations at site around the Commonwealth of Massachusetts. Much like we see co-location of different land uses in a mixed-use land development project, it will be very interesting to see if this symbiotic practice of co-locating solar and agriculture can be successful.

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Nick Golon Featured in New Hampshire Business Review’s Ask the Experts: Solar Energy

New Hampshire Business Review’s May 24th issue features a solar energy spotlight, with input from Nick Golon, PE. Read Nick’s insights below.

(Ask the Experts) What to Know When Investing in Solar Energy

Businesses seeking to stabilize the expense of their energy use can look at options for decreasing their needs and find alternative energy solutions. Investments in solar energy can help reduce reliance on a variable energy market and carbon emissions.

Our panel discusses what solar project options are out there, and how to take advantage of available incentives for energy system upgrades and solar power.

Our Expert: Nicholas Golon, PE, Civil Department Manager and Principal, TFMoran

Q: What is a “utility-scale” solar facility, and how is it different from a rooftop solar array?
Although the exact definition may vary depending on who you ask, the nature of the answer is typically the same: it is a large-scale solar generator, 1 megawatt (MW) or greater, that connects directly into the power grid, supplying a utility with energy.
Typically, there is a power purchase agreement between a developer and the local utility, guaranteeing a market for the developer for a fixed term of time, but we are also now seeing utility-owned, utility-scale solar projects, driven in part by utility providers’ ongoing efforts to support renewable energy initiatives.

Q: What are the greatest challenges facing “utility-scale” solar facilities in New Hampshire?
Location, location, locations. In that, the scale these facilities require is approximately 6 to 8 acres of usable land to accommodate 1 MW of generation (including solar equipment, panels, access and stormwater management).
Finding a site of this size, and in appropriate proximity to existing utility infrastructure, is a challenge. One par with finding a site that meets these basic criteria are the challenges derived by local land-use restrictions, as many municipalities did not contemplate the use of such facilities in the provisions of their zoning and site plan regulations.
Perceived environmental and wildlife impacts associated with land clearing and site preparation operations is also a challenge in the siting of these facilities, although these impacts may be offset with appropriate considerations of stormwater management best practices, inclusion of appropriate buffers to sensitive receptors, and use of wildlife-friendly fencing to accommodate wildlife activity.

Q: What future technologies/innovations do we have to look forward to with “utility-scale” solar?
Although the advancements in energy storage will be a prolific contributor to the advancement of solar science, we can also look in a different direction for innovation, as sometimes the best ideas are found in the most unlikely combination of two competing uses.
In this case, agrivoltaics, or dual-use solar and agriculture, is the use of land for both agriculture and solar energy generation. One of the acknowledged drawbacks for solar is the conflict it presents with agricultural production, as they share the commonality of preferred land conditions that are flat and provide abundant sun.
The co-location of such uses would provide benefits to both industries. Such facilities do exist in New England, such as the 4.2 MW Rockport Maces Pond Agrivoltaic project, a dual-use community solar project on a blueberry farm in Rockport, Maine, as well as the ongoing efforts of the University of Massachusetts Amherst through their research team.
The team has been collaborating with private solar developers and host farmers to implement agrivoltaic operations at sites around the Commonwealth of Massachusetts.
Much like to co-location of different land uses in a mixed-use land development project, it will be very interesting to see if this symbiotic practice of co-locating solar and agriculture can be successful.

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NEREJ Project of the Month: Sturdy Memorial Hospital Operating and Central Sterilization Suites

TFMoran structural engineers worked with Maugel DeStefano Architects to complete a renovation project at Sturdy Memorial Hospital in Attleboro, MA. The recently completed project is featured as Project of the Month in New England Real Estate Journal’s April 2024 issue.

The project included relocating and modernizing the hospital’s central sterilization processing and operating suites to a larger space. Moving the sterilization suite to this new space increased processing volume, provided a direct connection to the existing operating suite, and added space for same-day surgery pre- and post-operative suites. A new operating room, nurse station, offices, anesthesia workroom, sterile storage, and expanded equipment storage were added to the existing operating suite.

“Maugel DeStefano Architects’ healthcare design team, together with Columbia  and BR+A Engineers, has successfully undertaken substantial renovations in multiple areas of Sturdy Memorial Hospital, including the modernization of CT imaging, same day surgery, inpatient pharmacy, and LDRP,” said architect Colby Cavanagh, healthcare studio lead at Maugel DeStefano Architects. “We are pleased that our collective accomplishments have significantly enhanced the patient experience and improved the comfort and efficiency for Sturdy’s dedicated staff.” 

Colby Cavanagh, Healthcare Studio Lead, Maugel DeStefano Architects
New England Real Estate Journal

Check out the full article here.

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Jen Porter Featured in New Hampshire Business Review’s Ask the Experts: Women In Construction Overcome Obstacles, Innovate for Change

New Hampshire Business Review‘s February 23rd issue features a women in construction spotlight, with input from Jen Porter, PE. Read Jen’s insights below:

(Ask the Experts) Women in construction overcome obstacles, innovate for change

Women in Construction Week takes place the first full week in March, celebrating the history of women in the industry who faced tremendous challenges in a traditionally male-dominated field. In this issue of NH Business Review, we learn from an expert in the field who shares insights and perspectives on what it’s like for women in construction today, and how they’re helping to foster inclusivity, develop talent and innovate for the future.

Our expert: Jennifer F. Porter, PE, senior project engineer for civil/traffic, TFMoran Inc.

Q: What led you to choose a career in engineering?
A: Throughout high school I always thought my future career would be in the sky, as I wanted to be a pilot and go to Embry-Riddle Aeronautical University to study.

Sometime during my junior year in the early ‘90s, I attended a Women in Engineering Symposium at New Hampshire Technical Institute in Concord, NH. That day inspired me and shifted my interests back on the ground to the field of engineering.

When I enrolled at Bucknell University, I was unsure if civil or mechanical engineering was the correct path for me. Luckily, Bucknell requires all potential engineering students to take Engineering 101, a class that explores all disciplines of engineering with weekly hands-on problem-solving labs. It didn’t take long for me to decide to pursue civil engineering.

These early opportunities and hands-on learning not only taught me the skills required for my course work but also set the foundation for my future in engineering. The many hours of traditional academics and practical labs, in addition to my collegiate sports career — I was a member of the Track and Field team — helped me sort priorities and budget time; attributes that would serve me well in my profession. My engineering class had a very high percentage of women enrolled, and it’s where I developed some of my best friendships, many of which went on to be very successful women in the field of engineering.

Q. How can the construction industry attract and retain more women professionals, ensuring a diverse and inclusive workforce that enhances creativity and productivity?
A. Providing opportunities that introduce girls/women to construction and engineering opportunities can be the spark that changes the course of thinking for a young person. Many women do not consider the construction industry based on the simple lack of knowing it is an option. Having a sound understanding of basic construction and engineering principles and receiving proper training early in your career is key to establishing confidence and comfort in the construction environment. Providing resources for mentorship, male or female, can also make a tremendous difference to a new engineer starting out, so providing this resource is pivotal to women entering into the profession and staying with it.

I’ve had the pleasure of working for my current employer, TFMoran, for over 25 years. It has been my first (and only) engineering job since college graduation. I started at entry level in the office, running errands, making prints and reading regulations. I asked a lot of questions.

At TFM, I have had great mentors to educate and support me in my career. Teaching by example, showing patience, providing opportunity and pushing me to be a problem-solver by asking the right question and seeking out the answer. They provided me with challenges and the support I needed to grow as an engineer and a person. I am proud to be part of the team at TFM.

With the good also comes the bad, as I have had encounters in my career where my job experience appeared to be questioned due solely on my gender. When confronted with such a moment, I have felt I had two choices: deflect or stand tall. I have not let those moments define me, and have used each opportunity to build confidence and a greater belief in myself. To treat others with respect, setting boundaries to form positive relationships based on trust, and to project the confidence my experience and knowledge should garner after 25 years in the field of engineering. Much like the values my parents instilled in me, and I hope to inspire in my children, I choose to be fair and respectful to others. We should all expect nothing less. Treat everyone as you want to be treated.

Q. What initiatives or programs have proven effective in breaking down barriers and biases, promoting skill development, and providing equal opportunities for women pursuing careers in construction?
A. Educating men and women that intelligence is not defined by gender. Providing a company culture that brings everyone on the team to the table on equal ground and treated with respect. Engineers are engineers, period.

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Kyle Roy Featured in NHBR Ask the Experts: Engineering Best Practices Help Businesses Gain

New Hampshire Business Review‘s February 9th issue features an engineering spotlight, with input from numerous New Hampshire engineering professionals. Principal and Senior Structural Engineer, Kyle Roy gave his thoughts on engineering best practices and how businesses gain from these practices. Read Kyle’s insight below:

Ask the Experts: Engineering Best Practices Help Businesses Gain

As New Hampshire’s commercial building boom kicks into high gear in 2024, some of the Granite State’s leading engineering firms are using the latest cutting-edge technology to provide the best structural designs for their clients. In this week’s New Hampshire Business Review, we take a deep dive into how some of these tools will help these engineering firms deliver better projects and how they can improve their capabilities to better serve their clients. We also talk with both engineering and legal experts about how businesses can save energy costs and help the planet through NH Saves and what New Hampshire is doing to help curb greenhouse gas emissions.

Q: What emerging technologies are poised to revolutionize the structural engineering landscape, and how should businesses prepare to leverage them?
A: Structural engineers seek to provide innovative, efficient and safe structural solutions for every project. A company’s investment in efficiency will be successful if they are willing to rethink existing technologies and adopt recent technologies.

Q: What is a technology tool taking hold in the engineering sector?
A: Off-site and modular construction is established and currently one of the best ways to streamline the building process, to reduce waste and improve project timelines. New materials and fabrication technologies are challenging the industry to rethink what can be built off-site. Building projects must entertain new approaches and explore more off-site construction methods, materials and modular solutions.

Companies should invest in developing expertise in modular construction design. Building information modeling (BIM) is currently being used to create more accurate models that can be used on the fabrication floor to reduce production time and errors.

In addition to being leveraged in modular construction, BIM is a commonly used technology in the architectural, engineering and construction community. BIM is used to create digital representations of physical and functional characteristics of buildings. The digital models enhance collaboration, streamline design and facilitate better project decision-making.

The next evolution for digital models is to pair them with artificial intelligence (AI), and generative design (GD) software. Structural engineers can integrate the use of AI and algorithms to explore numerous generative design options rapidly. Companies should further invest in AI, adopt GD tools and train staff to effectively use it.

Companies that leverage these tools can speed up cloud collaboration and interoperability with other stakeholders in the design and construction process.

BIM models can also be generated from point cloud data from aerial and surface drone scans for existing site surveys and inspections. Drones provide a safe and efficient way to collect data from challenging or dangerous locations.

This data, when paired with cloud storage solutions, provides a significant improvement over traditional photos and field measurements. Companies should integrate drone and LIDAR scanning technologies in the early stages of design for better visualization, collaboration and more accurate data. Invest in drones or scanners and training for staff to champion the technologies.

Develop protocols for incorporating 3D point cloud data from these sources into the design processes. This can lead to improved project understanding of existing conditions, reduce field time and reduce design and construction errors and omissions.

Q: What should businesses do to support the use of building information modeling?
A: With more data collected, a fast and reliable infrastructure is necessary to process and share the data. 5G mobile promises faster and more reliable connectivity, enabling the growth of data collection and other data-intensive applications.

Businesses should explore how 5G can enhance their operations and services. This may require investing in new equipment, adapting IT infrastructure, and developing new applications that leverage high-speed, low-latency connectivity.

To take advantage of these technological advances, businesses should adopt an initiative-taking and agile approach. To do this, businesses need to hire or train to build a tech-savvy workforce who can understand, implement, and manage these technologies. Employers need to listen to and invest in their employee’s interest in specific fields.

This approach creates a base level of empowered staff to incorporate innovative technologies into the company’s service strategies.

Q: What do engineering firms need to do to remain competitive and productive?
A: Given the rapidly evolving nature of technology, it is important to stay informed on the latest developments. Businesses need to collaborate and network with vendors, technology providers, startups and research institutions to stay abreast of the latest innovative products and regularly monitor industry advancements.

It is important to adapt to changing technological landscapes. Companies that are nimble in adopting new tools and services will remain competitive in tomorrow’s engineering landscape.

Check out the rest of the article here.

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Nick Golon Reflects in New England Real Estate Journal’s Year in Review 2023

New England Real Estate Journal‘s December 30 issue features a Year in Review Spotlight, with input from numerous professionals across the Real Estate industry. Principal and Civil Department Manager Nick Golon gave his thoughts on the year with insight into his accomplishments and career in 2023.

What was your greatest professional accomplishment or most notable project, deal, or transaction of 2023? TFM partnered with Unitil and ReVision Energy in the development of the Kingston PV Facility, planned for construction in early 2024 pending final permit approvals. This 5-megawatt solar array would be one of the largest solar facilities in the state that’s currently in operation.

What emerging trends will drive investment and development in 2024?
Solar power has become the fastest-growing electricity source in the United States, representing more than 50% of generation projects that were planned for 2023. New Hampshire’s growth in solar energy is part of a larger national trend towards renewable energy, indicating the increasing importance of sustainable energy in the United States.

See more professionals’ Year in Review here.

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Merchants Way Featured as Top Project of 2023 by NEREJ

TFMoran project Merchants Way was recently featured in the December issue of New England Real Estate Journal (NEREJ) as one of the “2023 Top Projects”, after being featured as “Project of the Month” in the February issue.

TFMoran engineers worked with Interchange Development, LLC to design and permit Merchants Way, a 200,000sf multi-phase mixed-use development on Whitney Road at I 93 Exit 17. TFMoran’s services included master planning, civil/site engineering, traffic engineering, permitting, and landscape architecture.

TFMoran is proud to be a part of the team. See an excerpt from the article below.

Concord, NH Interchange Development LLC has completed the first phase of Merchants Way, a new Market Basket anchored shopping center located adjacent to I-93 at Exit 17 in the Penacook area of the city. Phase I of the 43 acre Merchants Way development includes a new 81,000 s/f Market Basket supermarket, 22,000 s/f attached HomeGoods retail space, a 13,500 s/f New Hampshire Liquor & Wine Outlet, and a 2,200 s/f Wendy’s Restaurant. The buildings were constructed in 2021 and 2022 along with two private roads, Merchants Way and Interchange Dr., which connect to Whitney Rod. and Rte. 4 next to I-93. The Merchants Way development complements the previously constructed Xtramart/Mobil convenience store with Dunkins and drive thru at Exit 17.

Interchange Development LLC Completes Phase One Construction of Merchants Way in Concord, NH
New England Real Estate Journal
February 17, 2023

Continue reading the article here.

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Queen City Center Featured in Business NH Magazine

Recent TFMoran project, Queen City Center was recently featured in the Business NH Magazine on Thursday November 30th, 2023. TFMoran is excited to be a part of the project, working closely with Lauer Architects and owners York Real Estate.  We invite you to check out the article by clicking this link or by reading the text below.


York Brothers Invest Millions to Create a New Entertainment Hub

Published Thursday, November 30, 2023
Author Matthew Mowry

From the outside, 215 Canal Street in Manchester is a nondescript old mill building with a chain link fence topped with remnants of barbed wire. The building that once held a printing company and then a defense contractor does not exactly scream “entertainment destination.”

Yet that is the vision for the building’s future that sprang from serial entrepreneur Travis York, who along with his brother Kyle, through York Real Estate, is investing $6.25 million to transform the 30,000-square-foot industrial building into Queen City Center, an entertainment hub in the middle of Manchester that will be brimming with activity by summer 2024.

York describes his new venture as a “curated collection of brands united by a shared focus on community, craft quality and entrepreneurship.”

What started as a need to relocate a video production company form Massachusetts to Manchester mushroomed into an entertainment complex that will be anchored by Harpoon Brewery, an employee-owned brewer of IPA that will include an experimental brewery, scratch kitchen and taproom.

The building will also include the video production and commercial content studio, Big Brick Productions, part of York’s marketing agency, GYK Antler, which is housed in his neighboring historic R.G. Cigar Factory building at 175 Canal St. Other tenants include: City Club Golf, a members-only club providing 24/7 simulated golfing and a lounge led by Lauren Ryan and Patrick Gocklin; Union Coffee, a specialty coffee roaster owned by David Cianci; Barre Life, a fitness studio owned by Ashley Oberg that will offer barre, yoga, Pilates and trampoline classes; Wicked Joyful, a pop culture shop owned by musician and comedian Nick Lavallee; Tenants have signed 10-year leases.

And York plans to develop the outdoor area between his two buildings to create green space and a gathering area that will feature a revolving selection of vendors and activities and worked with the city to disconnect the dead-end street that runs between the buildings.

The project aims to build on the activity in Manchester’s downtown, that includes thousands of residential units under construction, and attract workers to the area by providing more restaurant and entertainment options. “We employ creative professionals, and they want fun things to do,” York says. “It was a dated industrial building, and we are turning it into a modern gathering place.”

Touring the cavernous shell of the building in October, with wires and cables hanging from the ceiling and walls being torn down, it can be hard to see what it will be. But York’s passion for this newest venture is evident as he describes the businesses that will occupy various spaces that will bring people in throughout the day, from their morning coffee to evening drinks and concerts.

The location and potential of the building was too enticing for the York brothers to pass up. York points out it is less than a half mile from many workplaces, SNHU Arena and Northeast Delta Dental Stadium. The complex, which comes with 40 dedicated parking spots, sits directly behind The Double Tree Hotel with its conference center and an attached parking garage.

It is a new lease on life for a building that had been a mystery to York. “For years I’ve been looking at it wondering what was going on [inside],” says York. During the pandemic he got to know the owner of the business as well as the building’s owner and found out the company expected to outgrow the space and was relocating at the end of 2022. At the same time, the lease for his studio’s Massachusetts space was expiring.

“We started brainstorming what was logical to put in there and quietly reached out to folks,” York says. He wanted entrepreneurs with a “rising tide” mentality to create a center that could serve as a creative hub for Manchester. “We wanted to bring something new and different to the city,” he says.

York Real Estate spent almost $2.4 million to buy the building and another $3.5 million on construction. They also enlisted local partners to bring his vision to fruition, signing a management and construction agreement with real estate company Colliers in Manchester, collaborating with Lauer Architects in Goffstown, TFMoran in Bedford and securing financing through St. Mary’s Bank in Manchester.

York says he expects to turn over spaces to tenants by April or May, and Queen City Center is slated to fully open by summer. The building is almost fully committed except for one space that York says he is intentionally holding back to see what the best use will be.

“I hope we are inspiring others to do projects and rise up the community,” York says.

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Milford Cabinet Senior Housing Featured in the Union Leader

Soon to be ready for occupancy, TFMoran project Milford Cabinet Senior Housing, was recently featured in the Union Leader.

This 19th Century building in Milford, NH previously used by the Milford Cabinet for printing received renovations along with an addition which doubled its size to just over 24,000sf. Now an 18-unit apartment building, the “Milford Cabinet Press,” is taking rental applications and will be ready for occupancy in November.

TFMoran worked alongside WarrenStreet Architects and the owner Housing Initiatives of New England (HINEC) and provided civil/site engineering, structural engineering, environmental permitting, landscape architecture and land surveying services for the new affordable senior living apartments in Milford, NH.

Read the full article here.