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Market and Main Highlighted as Project of the Month in NEREJ

The New England Real Estate Journal has chosen the Project at Market and Main as the Project of the Month for July, just in time for the completion of phase one. Phase one of the reconstruction included the opening of the first two retailers to the new high-end lifestyle center, which includes Trader Joe’s and The Friendly Toast.

The mixed-use complex is set to include a movie theater, office building, hotel, retail shops and a variety of restaurants. In the article, TFMoran President Robert Duval states “Placing this variety of uses within walking distance reduces vehicle traffic, parking lots, stormwater runoff, improves air quality and permits denser development of the existing core areas of our communities”. The development highlights the importance of a pedestrian-friendly, lively atmosphere for all to enjoy.

TFMoran provided Civil, Structural and Traffic Engineering, Permitting, Landscape Architecture and Land Surveying Services for this project.

One of TFMoran’s Senior Landscape Architects Mike Krzeminski stated “We designed the landscape to include streetscapes with pavers, street trees, ample seating and bike racks. The pedestrian environment is further enhanced by a central green, with pergolas and seating walls to create an outdoor gathering place for all to enjoy”.

TFMoran’s project manager Chris Rice also said “Bedford has grown rapidly over the last number of decades, creating a demand for more shops, entertainment, restaurants, and commercial space. We believe this high-profile lifestyle center will draw in people from surrounding towns as well. The Town of Bedford is pleased to see Market and Main take shape”.

TFMoran has worked closely with the Market and Main Project Team including Prellwitz Chilinski Associates– Architects, Hutter Construction– General and Site Contractor, Sullivan Construction– Construction Manager, and Newmark Knight Frank– Retail Leasing Agent.

To read the full article, open the attached PDF. NEREJ Project of the Month July 2019 or view it below:

TFMoran and Encore Enterprises complete phase one of Market and Main – 350,000 s/f lifestyle center

BEDFORD, NH Phase One of the reconstruction of the former Macy’s site on South River Rd. is now complete. The first two retailers opened their doors in early spring at “Market and Main,” a new high-end lifestyle center. First to open was Trader Joe’s, a national food chain store, the third to open in New Hampshire. This one-story, 13,000 s/f store is at the main entrance of the development on the corner of South River Rd. and Main St., and includes an attached 2-story, 136-space parking deck. Second to open was The Friendly Toast, a one story, 3,500 s/f restaurant with 132 seats. Known for their homemade food and eclectic decor, the restaurant serves all day breakfast, lunch and dinner. This is the second New Hampshire location, the original is in Portsmouth, with three others in Mass.

Looking through the pergolas, seating walls and central green at The Friendly Toast restaurant

TFMoran began working with developer, Dallas-based Encore Enterprises, for permitting and plan approval of this new lifestyle center on the 16acre site, soon after Macy’s closed in 2015. In late 2016, the Town of Bedford approved plans for a 350,000 s/f mixed-use complex to include a 1,200-seat movie theater, an office building, a hotel, retail shops, and a variety of restaurants. “We appreciate the Town of Bedford and all they’ve done to make this happen here,” said Terry Robinson, vice president-project development for Encore Enterprises.

The benefits of mixed-use developments are being recognized by many community planners. According to TFMoran president Robert Duval, “Placing this variety of uses within walking distance reduces vehicle traffic, parking lots, stormwater runoff, improves air quality, and permits denser development of the existing core areas of our communities.”

Construction at the site began in March, 2017. Southern NH-based construction companies, Hutter Construction and Sullivan Construction are partnering to construct this $50 million project. Market and Main is attracting attention from national, regional, and local retailers and corporations.

“The property is strategically positioned along South River Rd. at the high-traffic intersection of N.H. Route 101, I-293, and the Everett Turnpike,” said Nicholas Barber, president of Encore Retail. “And its proximity and direct access to the Whole Foods plaza will make it a regional destination.”

The development created a new “Main Street,” which Bedford did not already have, and also a “Market Street” heading towards the Whole Foods plaza. Market and Main will represent a pedestrian-friendly place in town where everyone wants to go for a lively, upscale atmosphere including fresh, unique brands mixed with local favorites.

“We designed the landscape to include streetscapes with pavers, street trees, ample seating and bike racks,” said Mike Krzeminski, one of TFMoran’s senior landscape architects. “The pedestrian environment is further enhanced by a central green, with pergolas and seating walls to create an outdoor gathering place for all to enjoy.”

TFMoran is responsible for the structural engineering of the garages, as well as civil/site and traffic engineering, permitting, land surveying and landscape architectural services for the whole development. The complex will include seven new buildings, the existing Carrabba’s building and two new parking garages.

The architecture was designed by Prellwitz Chilinski Associates (PCA) of Cambridge, Mass. Their approach reflects both past and present; incorporating brick, granite, cast stone masonry, painted wood, and metal in a palette of modern materials and historical colors throughout the complex.

Trader Joe’s located on market St. at the Market and Main entrance- Bedford, NH

“Colorful awnings and canopies extend beyond the entrance, sheltering the shopper while on the sidewalk and inviting customers in,” said Laura Homich, senior associate of PCA.

“Seated outdoor patios nicely blend the interiors and exteriors of the entire property, and architectural details reoccur throughout the site, visibly connecting the complex as a whole.”

The new development is expected to generate approximately $1 million in new property tax revenue. “Bedford has grown rapidly over the last number of decades, creating a demand for more shops, entertainment, restaurants, and commercial space,” said TFMoran’s project manager, Chris Rice. “We believe this high-profile lifestyle center will draw in people from surrounding towns, as well. The Town of Bedford is pleased to see Market and Main take shape.”

 

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“Embracing Mixed-Use Development” by TFM President Robert Duval featured in May issue of High-Profile

Landscape Architecture and Civil Engineering was the Focus for High-Profile‘s May 2019 issue. TFMoran’s president, Robert Duval, PE, was featured as an Industry Expert in this special section, writing about the advantages for a mixed-use development. Using one of TFMoran’s high-profile examples of mixed-use, Market and Main in Bedford, NH (currently under construction), he quoted TFMoran’s Senior Landscape Architect, Michael Krzeminski, PLA explaining how he designs to provide a pedestrian-friendly experience. To view the story, click this link High-Profile May 2019_Embracing Mixed-Use Development or read below:

Embracing Mixed-Use Development
by Robert E. Duval

Adopted from urban environments, across the country, the mixed-use development concept is making its way into many smaller cities and towns in New England. These developments encompass a wide range of uses, including commercial, residential, cultural, institutional, and industrial uses in to an integrated whole.

Civil engineering benefits of integrated development include reduced traffic volumes, minimized parking needs, reduced stormwater flows, and greater density. Studies have shown that onsite parking supplies can be reduced by 10% or more because parking can be shared. Reduced parking cuts construction costs by reducing the amount of pavement as well as the extent of stormwater infrastructure needed to capture, detain, and treat pavement runoff.

Greater land use density can be achieved by avoiding internal line setbacks where multiple properties are combined into a single development. The result of this is efficiently designed parking and reduced need for land area, reduced construction costs, and minimized stormwater infrastructure and runoff.

Landscape architecture also plays a critical role in successful mixed-use development. Each building needs to be placed so as to provide convenient, attractive, and safe pedestrian travel between all other uses. “Walking distance” in New England is approximately 1,400 feet (about 7 minutes’ walk). This figure is dependent on the ease of travel; having a clear, direct path with an attractive walking environment improves walkability and the volume of foot traffic. Landscape architects must work closely with site engineers to create these easily traversable pedestrian routes.

Market and Main, a 350,000sf, upscale mixed-use center currently under construction in the town of Bedford, N.H., is a prime example. Located at the former Macy’s site on U.S. Route 3, TFMoran’s civil engineers and landscape architects worked closely with the developers to provide a pedestrian-friendly experience. “We designed the landscape to include pavered furniture strips along the sidewalks with ample seating and bike racks,” said Mike Krzeminski, one of TFMoran’s senior landscape architects. “Tree grates, along with structural planting soil, have been worked into the sidewalk design to create rhythm, shade, and sustainability for the trees,” continues Krzeminski. “The pedestrian environment is further enhanced by a central green, with pergolas and seating walls to create an outdoor gathering place for all to enjoy.” The first two retail buildings, Trader Joe’s and The Friendly Toast, are now open. The development plans include a 600-seat deluxe cinema, an office building, a hotel, a variety of restaurants and retail shops, and two parking garages.

The benefits of mixed-use developments are being recognized by many community planners. As these communities embrace mixed-use developments in their zoning codes, we can expect to see increasing prosperity and vibrancy in the central cores of our New England cities and towns.

Robert E. Duval, PE, LEED AP, is president and chief engineer at TFMoran, Inc., Bedford, N.H.

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Union Leader features first tenant at Woodmont Commons mixed-use development

Woodmont Commons, one of TFMoran’s mixed-use engineering projects, was featured in the Union Leader on April 17, 2019. The article released the name of the first tenant who is relocating to Woodmont Commons. 603 Brewery’s new 18,000sf facility, located on the new Main Street of Woodmont Commons, is nearing completion! The building will feature a tasting room, a 100-seat restaurant, and plenty of room for 603 to continue to brew their beverages. TFMoran provided civil/site engineering and structural design for 603 Brewery. The brewery was designed by McHenry Architecture and Harvey Construction is the general contractor. To read the article from the Union Leader, open the PDF here or read the text below.

603 Brewery relocating to become first tenant at Londonderry’s Woodmont Commons

Relocating: The new facility is expected to increase brewing capacity and include a beer hall.

By RYAN LESSARD Union Leader Correspondent Apr 16, 2019

LONDONDERRY—603 Brewery is starting to brew beer at its new 18,000-square-foot facility at 42 Main St. this month.

The address will be the first space at the Woodmont Commons development to see active occupants, according to developer Michael Kettenbach.

Brewery spokesman Morgan Kyle said the company, currently located at 12 Liberty Drive, will be gradually relocating between spring and early summer. The Liberty Drive location will remain open during the transition.

“We will start to slowly move operations over to the new building to ease the transition,” Kyle said. “We will start brewing in the new facility this month.”

The new custom-built brewhouse is expected to triple the company’s current brewing capacity. It will also include a large beer hall. “The beer hall will seat over 100 people, with additional seating in an outdoor beer garden and private function room,” Kyle wrote in a press release.

“The brewery will continue to run with their popular counter-service model and will offer a food menu, beers on tap, as well as retail merchandise and beers-to-go.”

Brewery co-founder Geoff Hewes said the goal of the beer hall is to offer the community a fun and casual setting to experience their craft beer and food.

“We look forward to expanding our ability to serve New Hampshire, both through our wholesale and retail partners, as well as by creating a destination for locals and tourists,” Hewes said in an emailed statement.

Part of the moving process will be transporting stainless steel, 30-to-60-barrel fermentation tanks from the old facility to the new one. Kyle said the new brewhouse is set up more efficiently, letting them get more done in a day than they could before.

The building also has a grain silo that holds up to 60,000 pounds of grain.

As part of the transition, the company is looking to hire more than half a dozen full-time and part-time employees. A job fair has been scheduled for Saturday from 10 a.m. to 2p.m. at the Liberty Drive address.

The brewery distributes in New Hampshire with Bellavance Beverage Company and New Hampshire Distributors, in Vermont with Calmont Beverage, and in Massachusetts through Horizon Beverage.

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TFMoran’s President, Robert Duval, and mixed-use development Market and Main, featured in Business NH Magazine

Business NH Magazine featured a TFMoran engineering project, Market and Main in their April 2019 edition. Market and Main is the new upscale mixed-use redevelopment of the former Macy’s site in Bedford. The first retail stores, Trader Joe’s and The Friendly Toast, are now complete, with more businesses on the way. Market and Main was the headline rendering for the BNH article titled “Engineering Firms Navigate Changing Economy” written by Melanie Plenda. TFMoran’s President and Chief Engineer, Robert Duval, PE was asked by Ms. Plenda what his thoughts are on the subject of the small retail sector. Below is an excerpt from the article:

“Small Retail Sector Is Strong”

“Robert Duval, president of TFMoran in Bedford, echoes this sentiment, saying that they’ve seen the growth in retail and commercial markets. While firms are not seeing construction of big-box stores like they were several years ago, they are seeing an uptick in mixed-use and small retail.

Duval points to one of TFMoran’s projects, Market and Main in Bedford, as an example. ‘[Market and Main] is indicative of moving toward more mixed-use centers,’ Duval says. ‘Whereas maybe 10 years ago or so, it would’ve been strictly a retail development. Now, it’s a combination of retail and commercial hospitality.’”

To read the full article open the PDF here .

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Woodmont Commons Featured in High Profile’s April Issue

Woodmont Commons was featured in High Profile’s April 2019 edition. TFMoran has been working with developers, providing civil, site, and structural engineering for the first phase of the development, which includes an 87-unit apartment building with retail space below and the new 603 Brewery location. These projects are well under way and have been progressing steadily towards completion. To read the full article from High Profile, open the PDF here or read the text below.

Construction Well Underway at Woodmont Commons

Londonderry, NH – Construction is well underway for the first two building projects in Phase 1 at Woodmont Commons in Londonderry. A new four-story, 87-unit apartment building with 23,000sf of retail space on the first floor is being constructed by Performance Building Company. The architect of record is Shook Kelley, with Gavin and Sullivan Architects providing additional design services for various projects within Phase 1. Also under construction is a new 17,000sf brewery and 200-seat restaurant with indoor/outdoor dining. 603 Brewery was designed by McHenry Architecture and is being built by Harvey Construction. TFMoran provided civil and structural engineering services for both buildings. Woodmont Commons is a new mixed-use development designed to be an urban village-style, walkable community in the rural countryside on over 600 acres. This unique multi-phased development is located off of I-93 Exit 4 and will include housing, retail stores, restaurants, office space, and amenities. TFMoran is working with Pillsbury Realty Development in providing civil and site engineering services, which included Michels Way, a new road connecting Garden Lane, and Pillsbury Road. The architect of record Shook Kelley of Charlotte, N.C., helped prepare the planned unit development (PUD) overall master plan. Attorney Ari Pollack of Gallagher, Callahan & Gartrell provided legal work for permitting and contracts for the development.

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Ribbon cutting at Trader Joe’s at Market and Main

Doors to the new Trader Joe’s in Bedford, NH opened on Friday morning, March 29, 2019 after the official red ribbon was cut. The first official customer was Grace Freire, who was followed by a long-line of excited shoppers. The Trader Joe’s crew were lined up inside the door to welcome shoppers and hand out a complimentary reusable bag custom-designed for “Live Free” New Hampshire. The colorful bags had illustrations of the state flower, and an apple, along with a recipe for New Hampshire Maple Sundae from the kitchen of Trader Joe’s. The interior walls of the grocery store are also custom to New Hampshire with beautiful painted illustrations reflecting some of the state’s treasured places.

TFMoran’s president Robert Duval, project manager Chris Rice, and marketing coordinator Susan Bartley were honored to attend the ribbon-cutting with Market and Main developer Terry Robinson of Encore Enterprises and Trader Joe’s Director of Construction, Lisa Robertson. Trader Joe’s is the first retail store to open in the new 350,000sf space upscale mixed-use center “Market and Main”, located off of South River Road (US Route 3) at the former Macy’s site. This one story, 13,000 sf± national food chain store is the third to open in New Hampshire. TFMoran provided civil/site and traffic engineering, permitting, land surveying, landscape architectural, stormwater monitoring and construction support services for Encore Enterprises.  Additionally, TFMoran provided structural design for a two-level parking deck which is connected to the retail building. The project architect is Prellwitz Chilinski Associates and the construction manager is Hutter Construction of New Ipswich, NH. Site construction began for the development in March 2017.

(Market and Main mixed-use center is designed to be a pedestrian-friendly place with a village green and pocket parks throughout. Plans include a 1,200-seat deluxe cinema, an office building, a hotel, a variety of vibrant restaurants and retail shops, and two parking garages.)

 

About Trader Joe’s Bedford

“At Trader Joe’s Bedford, we see ourselves as your neighborhood grocery store. Step inside and you’ll find unconventional and interesting products in the Trader Joe’s label like Mandarin Orange Chicken and Cold Brew Coffee Concentrate, as well as everyday basics like milk, eggs, meat, and fresh produce. We are a good source for great cheese and bakery items, and we offer a vibrant selection of fresh flowers. Most importantly, we offer all of our delicious, quality products at the very best prices. We’re happy to be part of your community, and proud to offer unique products at prices everyone can afford, every day.”

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Construction is well under way at Woodmont Commons

Construction is well-underway for the first two building projects in Phase I at Woodmont Commons in Londonderry, NH. A new 4-story, 87-unit apartment building with 23,000sf of retail space on the first floor is being constructed by Performance Building Company. The architect of record is Shook Kelley with Gavin and Sullivan Architects providing additional design services for various projects within Phase I.  Also, under construction is a new 17,000sf brewery and 200-seat restaurant with indoor/outdoor dining. 603 Brewery was designed by McHenry Architecture, and is being built by Harvey Construction. TFMoran provided civil and structural engineering services for both buildings.

Woodmont Commons is a new mixed-use development designed to be an urban village-style, walkable community in the rural countryside on over 600 acres. This unique multi-phased development is located off of I-93 Exit 4 and will include housing, retail stores, restaurants, office space and amenities. TFMoran is working with Pillsbury Realty Development in providing civil and site engineering services, which included Michels Way, a new road connecting Garden Lane and Pillsbury Road. The architect of record Shook Kelley of Charlotte, NC helped prepare the Planned Unit Development (PUD) overall Master Plan. Attorney Ari Pollack of Gallagher, Callahan & Gartrell provided legal work for permitting and contracts for the development.

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New Hampshire Union Leader features TFMoran Projects in “Engineers Week 2017”

On Monday, February 20, 2017 in the New Hampshire Union Leader’s “Monday’s Business” section, is a special section “Engineers Week 2017” which features an article by TFMoran’s president Robert Duval, PE.  The article entitled ‘Market and Main’ shows new trend in commercial land development appears on Page C6. ‘Market and Main’ is the large mixed-use development that will be constructed at the former Macy’s site on South River Road (US Route 3) in Bedford, NH.  To view the article click New_Hampshire_Union_Leader_02-20-2017_PgC6  or read text below.

‘Market and Main’ shows new trend in commercial land development

Over the past few years, TFMoran has been tasked to design several large development projects with major retail and other commercial components based on the “mixed-use development” (MUD) model, rather than the more traditional “shopping center” or “office park” formats. The difference is significant. Mixed-use developments feature a blend of distinct functions, often including — besides office or retail — residential, institutional, cultural, and industrial components, that are physically and functionally integrated, along with effective pedestrian connections.

The key concept here is the combination of multiple functions that complement each other and are linked with effective pedestrian connections. From an engineering perspective, if the various functions are truly complementary and have effective pedestrian connections, you can expect to see substantial benefits for a MUD over conventional developments.

For example, traffic volumes developed by shopping centers or office parks are fairly well understood, and can be easily determined by calculations based on the total square footage of floor space. On the other hand, calculating traffi c for mixed-use centers involves a second step that considers interaction between pairs of related uses — for example restaurants and cinemas, cinemas and apartments, apartments and offices, offices and restaurants, and so on, based on the concept that one vehicle trip may have multiple purposes, and these trips are shared among the various uses, rather than totaled up.

These multi-purpose trips can often reduce total trip generation by a third or more, thus significantly reducing offsite traffic impacts and costs of mitigation. Similar analyses of parking demand will also show reductions in parking demand, often in the range of 5% to 10%. These parking reductions can reduce costs and increase efficiency beyond just the pavement savings; as impervious surface area decreases, so too does the cost and extent of stormwater infrastructure to capture, detain, and treat all that unnecessary pavement.

Also, by integrating multiple uses into a single property or adjacent properties, sites can be masterplanned in a way that can ignore lot lines, thus greater land use density by avoiding internal lot line setbacks, inefficient parking layouts, as well as unnecessary driveways and utility connections.

At the former Macy’s site in Bedford, TFMoran has designed a large mixed-use development that is preparing to start construction of a 350,000sf mixed-use retail, office and entertainment development named “Market and Main.” Market and Main is designed to be a walkable, pedestrian-friendly place with a village green and pocket parks throughout. Proposed plans include a 600-seat deluxe cinema, an office building, a hotel, a premium entertainment venue, a variety of higherend restaurants and retail, and a 3-story parking garage.

The Market and Main development is located just south of the new Goffe Mill Plaza (former Wayfarer hotel), which contains a 40,000 sf Whole Foods Market, two restaurants, a bank, and is planning to develop additional retail space and up 150 apartment units. The proximity of these two sites enabled TFMoran to design a more dense and efficient layout for both sites by taking advantage of the traffic, parking, and drainage benefits of mixed-use developments, providing safe pedestrian connections between the major uses.

Although in some communities, mixed-use developments may be prohibited by conventional, exclusionary zoning ordinances, the reception of mixed-use projects from planners and regulators is generally positive, as mixed-use development can provide increased tax revenue and employment opportunities with few negative impacts, and more efficient use of existing infrastructure.

As a result, many communities already allow for this type of development in their zoning codes, and others are working on it. As a result, we can expect mixed-use developments to become an important part of the revitalization of cities and towns throughout New Hampshire.

Robert E. Duval, PE, LEED AP, is president and chief engineer at TFMoran, Inc. in Bedford. Founded in 1968, TFMoran is a regionally recognized survey, civil, structural, traffic and landscape architecture firm serving private and public clients inside and outside of New Hampshire.

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Robert Duval featured in New England Real Estate Journal’s 2017 Retail Forecast Spotlight

The January 27 – February 2, 2017 issue of the New England Real Estate Journal, features an article written by TFMoran’s president and chief engineer Robert Duval, PE, LEED AP. TFMoran is the exclusive civil engineer for the 2017 Retail Forecast Spotlight. The article, Mixed-use developments are becoming more popular than the traditional shopping center, appears in the Shopping Centers section of the publication, which can be viewed by linking here, or reading the text below.

Mixed-use developments are becoming more popular than the traditional shopping center
Robert Duval – TFMoran, Inc.

Many, if not most, recent large retail projects have been moving into “mixed-use development” centers rather than traditional shopping centers. A mixed-use development is, according to Wikipedia – “a type of urban development that blends residential, commercial, cultural, institutional, or industrial uses, where those functions are physically and functionally integrated, and that provides pedestrian connections.”

There are three key concepts here – the blending of multiple uses, integration, and pedestrian connections. All three are required for a true MUD. Without multiple uses you have… well, a shopping center. Without integration, you have just a collection of different uses with no interaction; and without pedestrian connections (which is really a form of integration) there is no advantage over driving down the street from one place to another.

From an engineering perspective, the advantages of integrated development over conventional shopping centers are substantial. For example, traffic volumes developed by shopping centers is fairly well understood, and is usually determined by plugging your total retail space into the appropriate formula for shopping centers and voila – you have your result.

On the other hand, for mixed-use centers there is a second step that involves looking at interaction between pairs of related uses – for example restaurants and cinemas, cinemas and apartments, apartments and offices, offices and restaurants, and so on, based on the concept that one vehicle trip may have multiple purposes, and these trips are shared among the various uses, rather than totaled up.

These multi-purpose trips can often reduce total trip generation by a third or more, thus significantly reducing off-site traffic impacts and costs of mitigation. Similar analyses of parking demand will also show reductions in parking demand, often in the range of 5% to 10%. These parking reductions can reduce costs and increase efficiency beyond just the pavement savings; as impervious surface area decreases, so too does the cost and extent of stormwater infrastructure to capture, detain, and treat all that unnecessary pavement.

Also, by integrating multiple uses into a single property, whether by consolidating parcels or simply by master-planning in a way that can ignore lot lines, greater land use density can be achieved by avoiding internal lot line setbacks, inefficient parking layouts, as well as unnecessary driveways and utility connections.

All the foregoing advantages of traffic, parking, and drainage are irrelevant if easy, convenient, and safe pedestrian connections are not provided between the major uses. New England weather being what it is, it is not realistic to expect that pedestrians will willingly park thousands of feet from their destination year-round. Therefore, direct, easily traversable pedestrian routes should be part of the earliest site planning exercises.

From a permitting point of view, as in so many other aspects of land development, the market is ahead of the regulation. In many communities, mixed-use developments will find they are prohibited by conventional “exclusionary” zoning ordinances and may require variances or zoning amendments to get off the ground.

However, the reception of mixed-use projects from planners and regulators is generally positive. Most communities understand the benefits of mixed-use development – in terms of increased tax revenue and employment opportunities with fewer negative impacts. Mixed-use centers, by their very nature, tend to locate in city centers within or adjacent to older, under-utilized manufacturing or commercial areas. This development thus provides the twin benefits of revitalizing city centers and reducing the need for new “greenfield” development. As a result, many communities already allow for this type of development in their zoning codes, and others are working on it.

As community planners catch up, we can expect more mixed-use developments to appear in our city centers (which, by the way, was the original purpose of a “city center”). The resulting increase in commer­cial activity will in turn create the positive employment and residential opportunities and more efficient use of infrastructure so important to the future health of our cities and towns.

Robert Duval, PE, LEED AP, is president and chief engineer for TFMoran, Inc., Bedford, N.H.